Important Articles

Scientists develop new ink formulation for security printing

In news
Researchers from Council of Scientific and Industrial Research- National Physical Laboratory (CSIR-NPL) have developed an ink that may help in combating the problem of counterfeiting of currency notes, fake printing of passports and pharmaceuticals.
Highlights
The ink is based on a single excitable dual emissive luminescent pigment.
This new security feature of the ink is suitable for printing of valuable products for protection against duplicity.
Counterfeiting of currency notes
According to the Reserve Bank of India’s (RBI) annual report 2018-19, the new Rs 500 and Rs 2,000 notes introduced after demonetisation are at the risk of duplication.
Dual emissive luminescent security ink 

  • The main task of the team was to select compounds, which do not obstruct the formation of the colours on the excitation of the wavelength.
  • For the production of luminescent pigment, two chemical compounds — sodium yttrium fluorite, europium-doped and strontium aluminate with europium-dysprosium — were synthesised to emit red and green colours, respectively.
  • The fluorescence property is through sodium yttrium fluorite, while the phosphorescence is by compound strontium aluminate.
  • The NPL researchers used the hydrothermal synthesis method to get the red colour. In hydrothermal synthesis, a compound is crystallised from an aqueous solution at a high temperature.
  • To get the desired features of the ink, the two pigments were admixed at a weight ratio of 3:1. The mixture was then sintered for three hours at a temperature of 400°C. The heating process is also known as annealing.
Feasibility
The feasibility of the ink for commercial applications has also been tested.
The patterns printed with this ink were not only subjected to rigorous atmospheric conditions such as hot, cold and humid conditions for six months but also examined after treatment with various bleaching agents (ethyl alcohol, ethyl acetate, xylene, acetone, and soap solution and laundry detergent) to ensure their chemical stability. The security features printed were found to be stable under stringent conditions. 
In news
Researchers from Council of Scientific and Industrial Research- National Physical Laboratory (CSIR-NPL) have developed an ink that may help in combating the problem of counterfeiting of currency notes, fake printing of passports and pharmaceuticals.
Highlights
The ink is based on a single excitable dual emissive luminescent pigment.
This new security feature of the ink is suitable for printing of valuable products for protection against duplicity.
Counterfeiting of currency notes
According to the Reserve Bank of India’s (RBI) annual report 2018-19, the new Rs 500 and Rs 2,000 notes introduced after demonetisation are at the risk of duplication.
Dual emissive luminescent security ink 
  • The main task of the team was to select compounds, which do not obstruct the formation of the colours on the excitation of the wavelength.
  • For the production of luminescent pigment, two chemical compounds — sodium yttrium fluorite, europium-doped and strontium aluminate with europium-dysprosium — were synthesised to emit red and green colours, respectively.
  • The fluorescence property is through sodium yttrium fluorite, while the phosphorescence is by compound strontium aluminate.
  • The NPL researchers used the hydrothermal synthesis method to get the red colour. In hydrothermal synthesis, a compound is crystallised from an aqueous solution at a high temperature.
  • To get the desired features of the ink, the two pigments were admixed at a weight ratio of 3:1. The mixture was then sintered for three hours at a temperature of 400°C. The heating process is also known as annealing.
Feasibility
The feasibility of the ink for commercial applications has also been tested.
The patterns printed with this ink were not only subjected to rigorous atmospheric conditions such as hot, cold and humid conditions for six months but also examined after treatment with various bleaching agents (ethyl alcohol, ethyl acetate, xylene, acetone, and soap solution and laundry detergent) to ensure their chemical stability. The security features printed were found to be stable under stringent conditions. 


Related Articles

»
India and EU have accomplished much. There is more to be done  22 Jan, 2020

»
UAE has been declared ‘reciprocating territory’ by India  22 Jan, 2020

»
India ranks 76th on WEF's Social Mobility Index   22 Jan, 2020

»
IVF is reversing an imminent extinction   21 Jan, 2020

»
Why ‘Make in India’ has failed   21 Jan, 2020

»
146 Irrawaddy dolphins sighted in Odisha's Chilika   20 Jan, 2020

»
Sanrakshan Kshamta Mahotsav  19 Jan, 2020

»
Seize the summit   19 Jan, 2020

»
“Shehri Samridhi Utsav 2020”  28 Dec, 2019

»
मानव संसाधन विकास मंत्री ने यूजीसी द्वारा विकसित पांच दस्तावेज लॉन्च किए  28 Dec, 2019